Download Perdido Street Station Doc ☆ 640 pages

Book Perdido Street Station

Download Perdido Street Station Doc ☆ 640 pages ´ A magnificent fantasy rife with scientific splendor magical intrigue and wonderfully realized characters told in a storytelling style in which Charles Dickens meets Neal Stephenson Perdido Street Station offers an eerie voluptuously crafted world that will plumb the depths of everS own curiosity and an uncanny reverence for this curious strangerWhile Isaac's experiments for the Garuda turn into an obsession one of his lab specimens demands attention a brilliantly colored caterpillar that feeds on nothing but a hallucinatory drug and grows larger and consuming by the day What finally emerges from the silken cocoon will permeate every fiber of New Crobuzon and not even the Ambassador of Hell will challenge the malignant terror it invokes BONUS This edition contains an excerpt from China Mieville’s Embassytow The universe got stuck in the age of steam And in this bizarro universe a lot of bizarro creatures do a lot of bizarro deedsThe clouds swirled in the city’s filthy microclimate It seemed as if all of New Crobuzon’s weather was formed by a massive gradual crawling hurricane that centred around the city’s heart the enormous mongrel building that suatted at the core of the commercial zone known as The Crow the coagulate of miles of railway line and years of architectural styles and violations Perdido Street Station An industrial castle bristling with random parapets The westernmost tower of the station was the militia’s Spike that loomed over the other turrets dwarfing them tugged in seven directions by taut skyrails But for all its height the Spike was only an annex of the enormous station The architect had been incarcerated uite mad seven years after Perdido Street Station was completed He was a heretic it was said intent on building his own godChina Miéville blithely scribbles away caring least about mechanics biology thermodynamics sociology common sense and any kind of plausibilityMercilessly exterminating all the bystanders in the plot China Miéville merrily rushes forth to create his monstrous steampunk horror taleThe only things that China Miéville cares for are all sorts of exoticaAt the far end of an entirely black corridor was a cactacae man Lin could taste his sap in the air but very faintly He stood seven feet tall thick limbed and heavy His head broke the curve of his shoulders like a crag his silhouette uneven with nodules of hardy growth His green skin was a mass of scars three inch spines and tiny red spring flowersThis is one of the humbler beings in the book though There is also a caterpillar but it is much psychedelic and sinister than the one in Alice in Wonderland Changes transformations and metamorphoses are a leitmotif of the book Everything flows and changes“This is what makes the world Ms Lin I believe this to be the fundamental dynamic Transition The point where one thing becomes another It is what makes you the city the world what they are And that is the theme I’m interested in The zone where the disparate become part of the whole The hybrid zone”There is nothing new under the sun however and like an angler of old the protagonist fishes for the most fantastic monsters using a trivial bait Fiction moves in a mysterious way

China Miéville ☆ Perdido Street Station Kindle

A magnificent fantasy rife with scientific splendor magical intrigue and wonderfully realized characters told in a storytelling style in which Charles Dickens meets Neal Stephenson Perdido Street Station offers an eerie voluptuously crafted world that will plumb the depths of every reader's imagination Beneath the towering bleached ribs of a dead ancient beast lies New Crobuzon a sualid city where humans Re mades and arcane races live in perpetual fear of Parliament and its brutal militia The air and rivers are thick with factory po Lots of people like to accuse China Miéville of writing with a thesaurus open next to his laptop How else to explain the freuent appearance of ossified salubrious susurrus and inveigled within the 623 pages of Perdido Street Station Ok so you can maybe argue that if you write a 250000 word book probably less than six of those words should be palimpsest but really I just think he's a smart guy who carefully controls his proseSo the language in The City The City is stripped down and spare because he is riffing on detective novel tropes Kraken is littered with pop culture references as he turns modern urban fantasy upside down And Perdido Street Station is dripping with ichor grotesuely ornate nouveau Victorian prose because that's the kind of book this is; dude clearly read a lot of HP Lovecraft speaking of which if you think this is hard to read just try a few paragraphs of that If you don't want to read something over the top generally safe to say don't read something by China Miéville As Roger Ebert likes to say this one goes so far over the top it circumnavigates the top and doubles back on itselfShit I don't mean to swear but if you are going to read this one you better be ready for some shit and some shitting and things that have recently shat I swear the only book with shat than this book is bookthis book|6426609 how else would you have him describe New Crobuzon A wasted diseased dark nightmare metropolis where an entire neighborhood huddles in the shadows of the skinless ribcage of some ancient felled beast where a gruff race of living cactus people inhabits a massive filthy greenhouse where the polluted waters run thick with eyeless corpses and surgically altered criminals and wingless bird men wander the streets Oh these words are too big What is going on Ok here you go The dirty city was brown The brown water ran brownly past the dirty brown banks A brown skinned man in a dirty brown trenchcoat walked brownly through the dirty brown lightI'm not saying you are dumb if you don't like this I am saying I like this The world of Bas Lag is like no place I've been before so I don't want to hear it described with a bunch of words I hear all the time You don't even have to know what they all mean Think about the word susurrus How does that make you feel I could have said a whispering sound but things don't make whispering sounds in New Crobuzon they make susurrus ones Trust me this is some salubriously ossified vocabularyShould I talk about you know the plot I don't think so I didn't know anything about this going in except that it was set in a big gross city and probably it was going to be hard to read it wasn't In broad strokes though it's nuts which you know to expect if you have read one of this guy's books before If you haven't had any good ideas lately possibly it is because China Miéville has been slinking into your bedroom wraith like to feast on your dreams conceptual spoiler alert Seriously I have read four of his books now and three of them are densely packed with enough cool concepts to fill at least twice that many normal books There is a reason this dude coined a new genreFor all the muchness on display for all of this book's wandering threads and oh this would be cool pit stops it's immensely readable and you know uite thoughtful I mean for a book with a sadistic eight legged scissor happy deus ex machinarachnid who talks in poetry and all caps If you can find another book that manages to cram a genuinely well developed sociological argument for Maxrism into the basic plot of Aliens on mushrooms well let me know I'll read that too Facebook 30 Day Book Challenge Day 11 Book from your favorite author

Doc Æ Perdido Street Station ☆ China Miéville

Perdido Street StationLlutants and the strange effluents of alchemy and the ghettos contain a vast mix of workers artists spies junkies and whores In New Crobuzon the unsavory deal is stranger to none not even to Isaac a brilliant scientist with a penchant for Crisis TheoryIsaac has spent a lifetime uietly carrying out his uniue research But when a half bird half human creature known as the Garuda comes to him from afar Isaac is faced with challenges he has never before fathomed Though the Garuda's reuest is scientifically daunting Isaac is sparked by hi This Steampunk meets New Weird meets Cyberpunk meets Fantasy novel has so many themes that I'm not even going to try to give it full credit with some sort of synopsis I'm rather just going to talk about various aspects of the book as I go along with my reviewThe way I felt when I finished the novel I wanted to give it 7 stars For a few reasons I'm having second thoughtsLet me start off the bat with some aspects that niggled meFirstly certain aspects of the world buildingMieville used a few mythological creatures and creaturestropes from popular culture as a template for creatures that he made his own which he gave his own uniue twist toOne of the things that bothered me a bit was how illogical the physiology of some of Mieville's sentient creatures are The biggest culprit for me was the cactus people I suspect that these creatures are a nod to videogaming culture but I felt that their inclusion detracted from the credibility of the 'mechanics' of Mieville's worldI could almost still live with the idea of having humanoids running around who look like cactus plants it's actually pretty cool in a comic book way but really cactus plants with human organs who reproduce the way humans do with males and females and the females even have breasts Oh come onnn that detracts a lot from the credence one might still have tried to give the other sentient creatures most of whom are plucked from the pages of mythologyIt might work as Bizarro but this work isn't entirely Bizarro; and for the amount of trouble that Mieville put into his world building one would expect all the nuts and bolts to fit together better into creating a world that works according to believable rules but sadly that is one aspect in which I found the novel lackingStill the creatures are uite fun and pretty cool Mieville might have taken them out of the pages of world culture but he made them fun and he made them his own and as such they lend a particular imaginative allure to the world of Bas lagFirst there's the scarab headed Kephri from ancient Egypt An Egyptian god who was patron of the sun creation life and resurrection In Mieville's world only the females are sentient which I found uite a hilarious twistThen the Vodyanoi from Eastern EuropeThese are mischievous water creatures in Eastern European folklore also called Rusalkas In Mieville's world they need to remain wet and have devised various techniues for keeping their skins moist while hob knobbing with the land creaturesAlso the half bird half human Garuda one of which is a main character in PSSI simply couldn't resist slipping this awesome artworkKing of Garuda by Jessada Art on deviantART into my review; it reminded me so much of the idea that I formed of the Garudas in Mieville's worldAccording to Wikipedia In Hindu religion Garuda is a lesser Hindu divinity usually the mount of the God Vishnu Garuda is depicted as having the golden body of a strong man with a white face red wings and an eagle's beak and with a crown on his headThroughout the Mahabharata Garuda is invoked as a symbol of impetuous violent force of speed and of martial prowess Powerful warriors advancing rapidly on doomed foes are likened to Garuda swooping down on a serpentIn Buddhist mythology the Garuda are enormous predatory birds with intelligence and social organizationPersonally I think Mieville could have tapped out of the mythology surrounding these majestic creatures for instance their antipathy with serpents shape changing abilities and so on On the other hand he attached such an interesting sociology to Garudas that I can completely forgive him for leaving out some features of the creatures from mythAs already mentioned to me most of the tropes worked uite well because in spite of the nonsensical physiology of for instance the cactus people and perhaps that of the Khepri the pure imaginative fun and originality of the off kilter physiues make the creatures memorableBesides the obvious borrowings from mythology there are aspects which feel like nods to common tropes in comic books TV shows and video games some of which are uite humorousFor instance there's a section where a cleaning machine becomes sentient because of a virus in its programming the process of which as Mieville describes it was pretty hilarious I laughed out loud He had a pretty funny depiction as well of sentient computing machines self organizing and wanting to take over the world which was excellent satire on both the actual internet and on tropes of the oh so prevalent pop theme of sentient robots wanting to take over the worldWhat made the whole AI theme really interesting and uber fun is that the book is set in a Steampunk background so all the computing machines run on steamand they're that ancient 50's kind that still worked with punch cards Very funny and a really enjoyable rompThemes like this all add to the fun but I think I prefer a subtle homogeneous canvas which comes across as an organic whole rather than a jarring comic book collage where the elements make up a mismatching pastiche and sometimes this book feels a bit like the latterIt's almost as if Mieville was trying to scrunch too many loose ideas into one world as if he didn't use enough self restraintNow to move on to some of the political aspects of the workThere is so much conflict here not just as reflected in the book but in myself over the book and over Mieville Mieville himself seems a complex creature every bit as complex as his workPersonally I find the Anarchist Marxist view a bit naive As far as I am concerned people are just never going to be philanthropic and astutely mature enough not to need any kind of government to regulate the cogs and wheels of human society So in my view thinking that we can dispense with all forms of government and live happily ever after in some kind of anarchic hippie commune just won't work Not unless everyone is put on drugs from an early age anywayMieville a rather radical Marxist shows us a negative depiction of government New Cruzobon is on the surface a democracy but in reality a police state The government is corrupt and makes use of secret police to control the populace Ironically rather similar to certain now defunct Communist governments from the pastBut perhaps Mieville isn't uite as naive as one might think People in power do after all tend to become corrupted by the sweet headiness of power the narcotic lure of power and we all know about the kinds of things politicians will stoop to to come in power or to remain in power and then there's also Capitalism and moral corruption all too real unfortunatelyso I have to admit that the depiction of New Cruzobon government and its machinations to remain in power is not uite so far fetched and one needn't even be aware of Mieville's personal ideology to identify with his cynical depiction of a conservative type of government in which secret police play a sinister role and which although a supposedly democratic government with a parliament seems to sit just just on the edge of totalitarianismAs for the rest of the novel; it is a melting pot of intertextuality originality and nods to and riffing on tropes but winding through it all like rivulets that eventually meet up with their mother river run plot threads that eventually meet up into one cataclysmic stream of events which touches the lives of the characters in the novel; nay not just touches heaves them up and carries them in a nightmarish torrent of events which changes them foreverIn spite of my criticisms this is a great book The way in which Mieville spun a web across the lives of several characters and have them all irrevocably touched by and changed by fate is pretty amazing; it reminded me of the web George Eliot spun through her novel MiddlemarchAlso like everybody else says in their reviews the world he builds is rich and imaginative if at times rather excessive in its detailProbably the hardest aspect for me with this work was interpreting when the author is being serious and when he is putting tongue in cheekThe last chapter of the book is serious That much I can tell you I cried My heart ached The ending of the book affected me so deeply that my insides ached for uite a while after finishing the book So kudos to Mr Mieville for managing to do thatIt is one of the most intimately personal parts of the book where Mieville bathes his characters in pathos He writes with amazing self control at the end I personally would have preferred a revenge ending; but this literature climbs above that It takes no sides it just shows It shows each of the human and non human yet so human characters in their acute frail humanity And these characters have grownIsaac the once callous and arrogant now broken in his shattered world has become softer is seeing the world from a different angle Yagharek finally comes to acceptance and but wait let me not spoil the plotJust read it I will add a small warning though you'll only see the plot threads drawn together at the end of the book so don't get too impatient if you don't see the entire painting the whole picture of the story before you're about 3 uarters through the bookMieville examines many ethical issues throughout the novel for instance among others How much are we allowed to sacrifice in the name of science How should punishment for heinous crimes be administered Is it acceptable to sacrifice a few to save many His answers regarding an ideal approach to these problems do not tend to be pat or preachy and although the reader might not always agree with the choices of the characters regarding ethics and morality at least Mieville is putting the issues on the table to be aired I do feel Mieville missed a few opportunities for instance with how callously Isaac treats creatures during his experiments I feel that Mieville could have had a character comment on this for example to highlight the issue and Isaac could have replied with an argument from the scientist’s point of view As it is it simply serves to add to the dislike one already feels towards the character regarding his hypocrisy in the way he conducts his interracial relationship with a Kephri womanAs a postscript I'd like to tack on a reference to a short story The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas by Ursula Le Guin in which she introduces one of the moral conundrums that one bumps your head against when looking at things from a utilitarian point of view namely when does it become acceptable to sacrifice the one to save the manyIn the novel reviewed above Mieville simply takes it as a given that it is uite acceptable from an ethical point of view for one person to be sacrificed for the many I don't necessarily agree with this assumption However if you think carefully about it it is an assumption that Christianity is steeped with; and in fact many religions including the ancient meso American religions have strong themes of it being good and justifiable to sacrifice few for the benefit of manyI'm not arguing with Mieville's stance on the matter since it is not a problem that lends itself to easy solutions I would have appreciated a bit soul searching on Mieville's characters part regarding this uestion though since it is a pertinent problem that is relevant to the citizens of the world todayBottom line is that although this novel has some flaws I thought the positives outweighed the negatives enough for me to give it four and a half stars rounded up to fiveHighly recommended to anybody who would enjoy a rich tapestry of gritty fantasy and who likes fiction that explores moral issues and new ideas Not for those who prefer their fiction prim proper staid and conforming to 19th century standards of writing