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Read & Download The Palm-Wine Drinkard and his Dead Palm-Wine Tapster in the Deads' Town õ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Ô This classic novel tells the phantasmagorical story of an alcoholic man and his search for his dead palm wine tapster As he travels through the lanThis classic novel tells the phantasmagorical story of an alcoholic man and his search for his dead palm wine tapster As he travels through the land of the dead he encounters a host of supernatural and often terrifyin. The tallest tall tale ever of what one champion boozer did to get a decent drinkA psychedelic uest as mindbending as Yellow Submarine the film but written fifteen years earlier and thousands of miles awayA myth told unusually in the first person by a trickster god slash Herculean hero with a Taoist fresh voice like a tarot FoolWhilst thanks to one or two other people on Goodreads I'd already figured that The Palm Wine Drinkard was a book to read because it's fun and interesting and strange and not just in aid of wholemeal sackcloth reasons like diversity uotas with which much of the internet pushesafflicts fiction from African countries I didn't expect it to like it uite this much or that I'd find it so funnySense of humour is personal yes and no one else has tagged this book as humour but here it was one of those works during which one feel laughter bubbling under the surface most of the time except during two or three brutal scenes then every now and again an audible fit of the giggles erupts Out of context without the tone and build up it's probably not clear why that particular phrase did it Some of the humour might run on the contradictions of conjunctions and other small words like a child might write many bizarre seuences of 'what happened' and less of how people thought and felt or yes like a drunk person might say or a transcript of conversation where sense chenges slightly as you go along eg because he was very clever and smart as he was only a Skull and he could jump a mile to the second Scenes that can be read as if they're satirising folktales because of the ridiculously convenient timing for example someone changes into an animal and overhears a conversation at exactly the right point to hear what they needed Not like they just missed it or had to hang around for nine hours waiting Dunno what the intention was but it worked to read them as knowing the naivety of the voice is perfect yet it's all so well constructed There is a lot of absurdity but perhaps you have to be there reading the whole book to really laugh These unknown creatures were doing everything incorrectly because there we saw that if one of them wanted to climb a tree he would climb the ladder first before leaning it against the treeOr a man asks to borrow some money after that I asked him where he was living and he replied that he was inside a bush which nobody could trace MJ's review lists some of the other great bizarre chapter titles but my favourite was this aided and abetted across decades by echoing Bridget Jones' famous pronoun elisions AFRAID OF TOUCHING TERRIBLE CREATURES IN BAGThis new edition has an excellent introduction by Wole Soykina that to my mind clears up points some earlier GR reviewers seem to have been scratching around for Discussing the initial negative reception of the book Soyinka mentions dismissal and condescension in Britain and Nigerian concerns that it pandered to ideas of uneducated colonials but in many ways Dylan Thomas' enthusiasm for the book made other critics and writers take a second look he considers it needed to be a Celt not an Englishman who'd get it being anti establishment and with a closer connection to fantasy and myth What an imaginative rupture of spelling to have turned a negative association into a thing of acceptance if not exactly approval Not ‘drunkard’ but – ‘drinkard’ Difficult to damn ‘drinkinness’ with the same moralistic fervour as drunkenness The social opprobrium attached to the grammar strict word is dissipated and the anti hero is accepted as a first rate raconteur The title then sets the pattern for a narrative of weird encounters Tutuola was not shut off from the ‘correct’ usage of the English language; he simply chose to invent his own tongue festooned with uproarious images turning it into a logical vehicle of the colonial neither nor or all comer environment This was a polyglot proletariat Tutuola intuitively realised that the common ‘broken English’ or patois would not suffice to capture the sounds of such a community – a world that was too realistic to be liminal too paranormal to be realistic each segment intersecting with others according to its own lawsThere are inevitably various bits and pieces in reviews characterising the book as uintessentially African or primitivist or something But whilst knowing not much at all about Yoruba or African cultures in general and also seeing a universality in its folktaleness reminiscent of myth based stories from and about elsewhere I'd say this is uintessentially African like Mark E Smith's songs are uintessentially Northern English That's definitely there part of the spirit of the exercise but the main thing is actually this surreal genius doing strange things with language and images and ideas things that could look simple and crazy but are actually very clever indeed

The Palm Wine Drinkard and his Dead Palm Wine Tapster in the Deads' TownThis classic novel tells the phantasmagorical story of an alcoholic man and his search for his dead palm wine tapster As he travels through the land of the dead he encounters a host of supernatural and often terrifyin. The tallest tall tale ever of what one champion boozer did to get a decent drinkA psychedelic uest as mindbending as Yellow Submarine the film but written fifteen years earlier and thousands of miles awayA myth told unusually in the first person by a trickster god slash Herculean hero with a Taoist fresh voice like a tarot FoolWhilst thanks to one or two other people on Goodreads I'd already figured that The Palm Wine Drinkard was a book to read because it's fun and interesting and strange and not just in aid of wholemeal sackcloth reasons like diversity uotas with which much of the internet pushesafflicts fiction from African countries I didn't expect it to like it uite this much or that I'd find it so funnySense of humour is personal yes and no one else has tagged this book as humour but here it was one of those works during which one feel laughter bubbling under the surface most of the time except during two or three brutal scenes then every now and again an audible fit of the giggles erupts Out of context without the tone and build up it's probably not clear why that particular phrase did it Some of the humour might run on the contradictions of conjunctions and other small words like a child might write many bizarre seuences of 'what happened' and less of how people thought and felt or yes like a drunk person might say or a transcript of conversation where sense chenges slightly as you go along eg because he was very clever and smart as he was only a Skull and he could jump a mile to the second Scenes that can be read as if they're satirising folktales because of the ridiculously convenient timing for example someone changes into an animal and overhears a conversation at exactly the right point to hear what they needed Not like they just missed it or had to hang around for nine hours waiting Dunno what the intention was but it worked to read them as knowing the naivety of the voice is perfect yet it's all so well constructed There is a lot of absurdity but perhaps you have to be there reading the whole book to really laugh These unknown creatures were doing everything incorrectly because there we saw that if one of them wanted to climb a tree he would climb the ladder first before leaning it against the treeOr a man asks to borrow some money after that I asked him where he was living and he replied that he was inside a bush which nobody could trace MJ's review lists some of the other great bizarre chapter titles but my favourite was this aided and abetted across decades by echoing Bridget Jones' famous pronoun elisions AFRAID OF TOUCHING TERRIBLE CREATURES IN BAGThis new edition has an excellent introduction by Wole Soykina that to my mind clears up points some earlier GR reviewers seem to have been scratching around for Discussing the initial negative reception of the book Soyinka mentions dismissal and condescension in Britain and Nigerian concerns that it pandered to ideas of uneducated colonials but in many ways Dylan Thomas' enthusiasm for the book made other critics and writers take a second look he considers it needed to be a Celt not an Englishman who'd get it being anti establishment and with a closer connection to fantasy and myth What an imaginative rupture of spelling to have turned a negative association into a thing of acceptance if not exactly approval Not ‘drunkard’ but – ‘drinkard’ Difficult to damn ‘drinkinness’ with the same moralistic fervour as drunkenness The social opprobrium attached to the grammar strict word is dissipated and the anti hero is accepted as a first rate raconteur The title then sets the pattern for a narrative of weird encounters Tutuola was not shut off from the ‘correct’ usage of the English language; he simply chose to invent his own tongue festooned with uproarious images turning it into a logical vehicle of the colonial neither nor or all comer environment This was a polyglot proletariat Tutuola intuitively realised that the common ‘broken English’ or patois would not suffice to capture the sounds of such a community – a world that was too realistic to be liminal too paranormal to be realistic each segment intersecting with others according to its own lawsThere are inevitably various bits and pieces in reviews characterising the book as uintessentially African or primitivist or something But whilst knowing not much at all about Yoruba or African cultures in general and also seeing a universality in its folktaleness reminiscent of myth based stories from and about elsewhere I'd say this is uintessentially African like Mark E Smith's songs are uintessentially Northern English That's definitely there part of the spirit of the exercise but the main thing is actually this surreal genius doing strange things with language and images and ideas things that could look simple and crazy but are actually very clever indeed

Free read ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ò Amos Tutuola

The Palm-Wine Drinkard and his Dead Palm-Wine Tapster in the Deads' Town À Wine Drinkard is regarded as the seminal work of African literature'Brief thronged grisly and bewitching' Dylan Thomas Observer'Tutuola's art conceals or rather clothes his purpose as all good art must do' Chinua Ache. In a recent NY Times Book Review article Nigerian writer Chigozie Obioma told a story about how when he was freuently ill as a child his father would tell him wild stories Puzzled as to why this stopped he asked his father for an explanation who explained that Chigozie was now old enough to read on his own handing him The Palm Wine Drinkard It turns out his father had no imagination whatsoever and the stories were all from this book by Amos TutuolaThe protagonist is a drunk having started early at age 10 His father hires a tapster who falls out of a tree and dies at which point the drunk decides to find him no matter what The reader is then carried into the African bush on a psychedelic magical mystery tour of numerous West African folk tales Weird compelling gruesome fantastic alternating dark and light magical realism Free read ✓ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ò Amos Tutuola

Amos Tutuola ò 6 Read & Download

Amos Tutuola ò 6 Read & Download G beings among them the complete gentleman who returns his body parts to their owners and the insatiable hungry creature Mixing Yoruba folktales with what T S Eliot described as a 'creepy crawly imagination' The Palm. I read this book many years ago Today I picked the book off my shelves and re read the first lines It still makes the hair rise on the back of my neck I was a palm wine drinkard since I was a boy of ten years of age I had no other work than to drink palm wine in my life But when my father noticed that I could not do any work than to drink he engaged an expert palm wine tapster for me; he had no other work than to tap palm wine every day So my father gave me a palm tree farm which was nine miles suare and it contained 560000 palm trees and this palm wine tapster was tapping one hundred and fifty kegs of palm wine every morning but before 2 o’clock pm I would have drunk it all; after that he would go and tap another 75 kegs The book tells of the sad demise of our hero’s palm wine tapster and of the search to find him In effect this single narrative holds together a seuence of uite separate folk stories For several pages one feels one is entering a rather genial world full of the folksy stories of the kind one might read to children But then one finds that these are not children’s stories at all Much than those of the Brothers Grimm or of Hans Christian Anderson these stories are harsh and blood curdling almost too painful to readTheir major themes are dismemberment abduction and death We meet Death himself whose household furniture and firewood is made from human remains We meet a “gentleman” of great beauty who has abducted a young woman This man has hired his body parts from traders and when he returns these to their owners he is reduced merely to being a skull who lives in a hole in the ground It is not however the single horrific images or single stories that are difficult to cope with but rather the accumulation of these images one piled upon another Later in life Tutuola gained some small acceptance in the Nigerian literary establishment However for many years he was disparaged by his fellow writers who disliked his portrayal of Yoruba culture and his fluid un literary style They perhaps too felt that as the comedy of the first pages dissipates into horror that this is a very strange book indeed