Download The World We Have Lost doc ´ 376 pages

book The World We Have Lost

Download The World We Have Lost doc ´ 376 pages í The World We Have Lost is a seminal work in the study of family and class kinship and community in England after the Middle Ages and before the changes brought about by the Industrial Revolution The book explores the size and structure of families in pre industrial England the numbeNority of gentry rates of migration the ability to read and write the size and constituency of villages cities and classes conditions of work and social mobility Useful for the historically minded for at least two reasons First it’s a good reminder of just how simple the statistics were not so long ago and for related reasons how uncomplicated they can be and still make a compelling argument Secondly what is revealed when one takes the time to look at class dynamics based on the data available rather than theoretical presumptionsTo that latter point it’s an instructive piece of realism to point out that when Marx talks about “feudalism” we think knights and villeins But that’s not really the way it worked at least not in England from Elizabeth through say Austen Actually it was like Austen and we’re nostalgic for that world for all kinds of weird reasons But as Laslett points out so well just because it doesn’t look like knights and villeins doesn’t mean that the Marxian logic doesn’t apply You just have to realize that Marx was arguing ahead of the data

Peter Laslett ô The World We Have Lost kindle

The World We Have Lost is a seminal work in the study of family and class kinship and community in England after the Middle Ages and before the changes brought a A long time ago in a sixth form far far away I read uite a bit of English social history; Cole and Postgate’s The Common People EP Thompson’s The Making of the English Working Class were typical examples This book is very much in that tradition written in the 1960s when historians’ interest in how people lived the details of their births marriages and deaths what they ate and how communities worked started to become mainstream It is a fairly forensic exmaniation of the condition of Engligh society in the seventeenth century before the Industrial Revolution got going I had never heard of it and came across it uite by chance in a charity bookstall in Longridge But a little bit of background research tells me that Laslett’s work is still considered to be essential preparatory reading for any student of early modern or modern social historyI found this an absolutely fascinating read; some of the content was fairly familiar to me for example the debunking of the notion that teenage marriage was the norm in early modern English society and a lot was brand new again as an example I hadn’t really appreciated the extent to which the nuclear family has been the bedrock of English society for the hundreds of years and that even then the old tended to live and die aloneBut the most interesting feature reading this book was the sense of reading a book about 17th century written in 1965 but with 40 to 50 years of hindsight on top The final chapter of the book “Understanding Ourselves in Time” is essentially an essay on the process of developing historical knowledge and insight and how we understand ourselves in contrast with our ancestors Laslett was writing 20 years after the creation of the Welfare State and with the perspective of the enormous benefits it had brought to British society Reading this in 2015 things seem so much complex but nonetheless I can heartily recommend this book to anyone interested in history and in fact to anyone who has never picked up a history book in their lives but is interested in how our society was made

ePub Ë The World We Have Lost ô Peter Laslett

The World We Have LostBout by the Industrial Revolution The book explores the size and structure of families in pre industrial England the number and position of servants the elite mi Turns out the Middle Ages really weren't that bad