Download Night of the Jabberwock Book ☆ 202 pages à Fredric brown

Doc Night of the Jabberwock

Download Night of the Jabberwock Book ☆ 202 pages à Fredric brown È This sharp ironic tightly written thriller takes place during a single night during which our narrator editor of a small city newspaper shows what stuff journalists were made of then by consuming a truly epic amount of alcohol and unweF then by consuming a truly epic amount of alcohol and unweaving an artfully tangled web I began to read American pulp thrillers some 30 years ago it was an extension of my love of 1940s film noir and the self conscious use of them by the French New Wave filmmakers The ones I like tend to deal with desire transgression delirium and lots of murky morality And most importantly they are always less than 250 pages long there should be a law making it illegal to write thrillers longer than this I read pulp for their stories and after 250 pages my attention span is reached and my interest wanders I expect interesting situations but not profound moral investigations I don’t read that many but now and again I will have a binge The Night of the Jabberwock is nicely delirious There is a story about a Lewis Carroll enthusiast; a small man who tells of a secret society of Carroll enthusiasts and hints that they have discovered the way to another form of reality; a kidnapping by two bank robbers and a shootout; a murder and then a missing body; two dead men in the trunk of a car; a pursuit by the police It presents an insane and illogical world that spirals out of control throwing the first person narrator into danger In the end rationality is discovered and everything is explained everything being reduced to fiendishly clever plotting by the villain and by Brown Although the kidnapping bank robbers were just coincidental I like the delirium but the explanations return the world to complacent normality

Ebook ´ Night of the Jabberwock æ Fredric Brown

H our narrator editor of a small city newspaper shows what stuff journalists were made o Enjoyable and eccentric mystery tale with a Lewis Carroll spin As a fan of the Alice takes I was totally sucked in and was kept curious throughout Delightful way to spend some time particularly if you like your mysteries with a side of madness

Fredric Brown æ Night of the Jabberwock Ebook

Night of the JabberwockThis sharp ironic tightly written thriller takes place during a single night during whic What a strange bookReview of Kindle editionPublication date December 26 2016Publisher Endeavour VentureLanguage EnglishASIN B01N1WIER0What a strange book even for Fredric Brown Not sci fi but one of his crime novels the action from about page 83 to the end is almost a fairly normal crime story with an involved twisted plot to keep the reader on the edge of his seat But the first 83 pages read almost as if they are part of a different book After complaining about owning a small down weekly newspaper for 23 years and never having a real story events dump a plethora of stories in Doc's lap all in one night Then the last part of the book makes everything which went before seem almost ordinary Doc gets his wish for a real story in spadesIf you don't know why Yehudi Smith is such a humorous and hard to believe name I didn't either so I looked it up The most common story ties it to the Pepsodent sponsored Bob Hope radio show on NBC which started in 1938 There was a running gag on the show a catchphrase of supporting player Jerry Colonna who would regularly ask “Who’s Yehudi” This became extremely popular and provoked a song in 1941 These were simpler daysThe earliest example in print of Yehudi in a sense of something that isn’t there is from the Science News Letter of September 1940 “The machine has not received a nickname as yet Since it deals with imaginary numbers it may answer to the name of ‘Yehudi’” In 1942 a film entitled Crazy Cruise featured an invisible battleship the SS Yehudi The following year one of the very earliest US military stealth projects was called Project YehudiI haven’t been able to find any earlier references so the word really may have its origin in Jerry Colonna’s catchphrase If it does then there may well be a connection with Yehudi Menuhin The story claims that Menuhin was engaged to play on one of the early shows but that Jerry Colonna didn’t know who he was and went around asking the cast This is supposed to have led to the running gag of his trying to identify YehudiPart of the popularity of Yehudi as a term for an invisible entity may lie in a linkage in people’s minds with a rhyme by Hughes Mearns that was set to music as The Little Man Who Wasn’t There in 1939 — just when the Colonna catchphrase was becoming known From a post on World Wide WordsOnly four stars because events are so unbelievable and the book is a little disjointed I downloaded this through Kindle Unlimited